November 1, 2021

The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau

Prime Minister of Canada

The Honourable Sean Fraser

Minister of Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada

The Honourable Mélanie Joly

Minister of Foreign Affairs

 

Urgent Call to Action in Response to the Crisis in Afghanistan

 

Canadians have broadly applauded the announcements that Canada is admitting and resettling Afghans who assisted the Canadian mission as well as vulnerable Afghans. This positive response reflects the best of Canadians; it is also the right thing to do. We stand with those who now lack protection in Afghanistan under the Taliban – women judges, journalists, female leaders, LGBTI individuals, religious minorities, and human rights advocates. This is who Canadians are and should strive to be.

There is no denying the complexity of the challenges that confront Canada after the fall of Kabul. There is also no escaping the human tragedy that unfolded around the airport and continues to this day.

We write to you now as individuals and organizations deeply engaged in Canada’s response to the Afghan crisis, including those involved in efforts to help evacuate vulnerable persons from Afghanistan in an effort to bring them to Canada. These are the individuals most at risk of violence and reprisals following the Taliban takeover in mid-August 2021.

However, despite the collective efforts of the signatories, and despite their identification within Canada’s Special Immigration Program and Special Humanitarian Program, few of the “at risk” Afghans identified have been evacuated to Canada, and a very large number remain in grave danger.

 In many cases, the Taliban are actively searching for these individuals: their time is running out. Evacuating them safely and relocating them to Canada has proven difficult for several reasons. A number of those factors are, however, within Canada’s control.

First, there is lack of clarity regarding which individuals qualify for Canada’s Special Immigration Program and resettlement to Canada as refugees. Second, there is a shortage of processing capacity to match both the magnitude and urgency which the current situation requires. Third, Canada ought to waive the requirement of UNHCR recognition and recognize the Afghan crisis as a prima facie refugee situation. Finally, in working with allies, Canada can exercise the leverage it collectively holds, in order to pressure the Taliban to allow at-risk individuals to safely exit Afghanistan.

At the outset, the signatories wish to make clear that we hold Canadian officials with whom the signatories have worked in this process in the highest regard. Without fail, those officials, and the political staffers engaged in this work, have shown deep commitment at all hours to achieving a humane and expedient response, and have done everything possible to assist. But officials can only do so much. There comes a point when political leadership is required, and when only Ministerial direction can provide the authority needed to move matters forward.

Now that the new cabinet has been appointed, the time has come for that leadership. The signatories therefore call upon Prime Minister Trudeau, Minister of Immigration, Refugees, Citizenship Canada Sean Fraser and Minister of Foreign Affairs Mélanie Joly to urgently address the following four major issues that must be resolved if Canada is to achieve its purpose in securing the safe and timely evacuation of the at-risk individuals from Afghanistan targeted through Canada’s special programs.

  • Clarify Canada’s policy by defining its

“Assistance to Canada”: In July 2021, Canada announced the establishment of a program for Afghans who assisted Canada and pledged to protect individuals who exhibited a “significant and enduring relationship with Canada”. Canada set out simple procedures for applying to the program, through which Canada would facilitate their safe passage out of Afghanistan.

Canada announced that it would interpret the concept of “assistance to Canada” broadly, but it remains difficult to understand who might qualify.

Canada must clarify the policy as between Immigration, Refugees, Citizenship Canada and Global Affairs Canada. It must also continue to interpret the terms broadly in order to meet the spirit of the program announced in July 2021.

Accepted Categories: In August 2021, Canada introduced a second program for vulnerable Afghans including women leaders, human rights advocates, persecuted religious or ethnic minorities, LGBTI individuals, and journalists who helped Canadian journalists.

In the absence of UNHCR in Afghanistan, Canada wisely identified alternate organizations with a presence in Afghanistan – Frontline Defenders and Protect Defenders – to assist evacuees. The signatories understand that the intention with these referral partners is to create a fair, transparent, and equal system for processing on the ground in Afghanistan. However, these organizations have their own mandates – namely they are largely focused on human rights defenders – and this has drastically narrowed the otherwise broad mandate of Canada’s programs.

Once again, a lack of clarity has proven frustrating and has impeded progress for many who are trying to navigate the system. Canada must clarify who specifically can apply through its programs and through the referral partners.

Further, Canada must seek partnerships with other organizations on the ground in Afghanistan to ensure that individuals who otherwise meet the eligibility criteria for the special programs can be identified and processed.

  • Devote Significant Resources Needed to Get the Job Done, and Permit Discretion for Decision Makers as

The work in Afghanistan is urgent and time-consuming. Receiving files, reviewing them, making decisions, and communicating with applicants, affected parties and their representatives cannot be treated as “business as usual”. Significant additional human resources must be committed immediately to enable Canadian officials to process and receive the large numbers of persons who cannot wait until their cases are considered “in the usual course”. While the signatories understand that some additional resources have already been allocated to this portfolio, the situation in Afghanistan urgently requires more. This includes additional processing staff. Further, where appropriate, Canada must permit discretionary decisions by case officers in order to proceed in an expeditious manner.

  • Waive the Requirement of UNHCR Recognition, and Recognize the Afghan Crisis as a Prima Facie Refugee Situation.

We ask the government to waive the requirement of UNHCR recognition for Afghan nationals being resettled via private sponsorship. We further call on the Ministers to recognize the Afghan crisis as a prima facie refugee situation.

  • Working with Allies, Demand Assurances from the Taliban

Canada and its allies should bring every possible pressure to bear in seeking assurances from the Taliban. The signatories call on Canada to exercise its international leverage with like-minded countries to pressure the Taliban to allow at-risk individuals to safely exit Afghanistan. Canada must continue to seek assurances that all individuals who qualify for its programs will be permitted to travel safely out of Afghanistan. Rather than act alone in this effort, Canada should join with its allies and like-minded entities to secure these assurances. This is a key tool Canada has at its disposal to assist the desperate individuals who are reaching out to Canadians on a daily basis and who fall within the mandate that Canada has accepted within both its Special Immigration Program and its Special Humanitarian Program.

Conclusion

Prime Minister and Ministers: this urgent situation requires an immediate, multi-faceted, and focused response. Afghans at risk, such as female judges, are in hiding and are being actively pursued by released prisoners, Taliban officials, and ISIS-Khorasan. Afghanistan continues to fall into a deepening crisis where individuals are left at the mercy of the Taliban, often without the essentials needed to meet basic sustenance needs.

The signatories further call upon Canada to clarify and fulfill its pledge to adopt an expansive interpretation of who has “assisted” Canada and its allies in Afghanistan and support – meaningfully, practically, immediately – those who supported us. The signatories also call upon Canada to clarify and fulfil its pledge to adopt an expansive interpretation of the accepted categories through the Special Humanitarian Program including women leaders, human rights advocates, persecuted religious or ethnic minorities, LGBTI individuals, and journalists who helped Canadian journalists.

Just days into the mandate of the new Cabinet, its members are called upon to deal with this crisis. Yet moments of crisis can offer extraordinary opportunity. They invite us to reveal who Canadians are. The effective and safe evacuation of vulnerable individuals from Afghanistan will help illustrate the values and priorities of the newly-elected government. It will also demonstrate the compassion and humanity of Canadians while invoking a collective sense of purpose.

As the new Cabinet begins its important work, the signatories eagerly await a meaningful response to this letter, and the signatories undertake to do everything they can to assist the government in the achievement of these vital goals.

Sincerely,

Lloyd Axworthy, Fen Osler Hampson, Senator Ratna Omidvar, Allan Rock, World Refugee & Migration Council

Asma Fairzi, Adeena Niazi, Afghan Women’s Organization Refugee and Immigrant Services

Ketty Nivyabandi, Amnesty International Canada

Stephanie Valois, Association québécoise des avocats et avocates en droit de l’immigration

Aviva Bassman, Canadian Association for Refugee Lawyers

Ibrahim Mohebi, Canadian Hazara Humanitarian Services

Farida Deif, Human Rights Watch

Sally Armstrong, Wendy Cukier, Hila Taraky, Lifeline Afghanistan

Rachel Pulfer, Journalist for Human Rights

Warda Shazadi Meighen, Erin Simpson, Jacqueline Swaisland, Landings LLP

Grace Westcott, Peter Showler, PEN Canada

Kimahli Powell, L.L.D (Hons) Rainbow Railroad

 

 


 

Lettre ouverte au premier ministre du Canada, au ministre de l’Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté, et à la ministre des Affaires étrangères

1 Novembre 2021

 

Le très honorable Justin Trudeau

Premier Ministre du Canada

L’honorable Sean Fraser

Ministre de l’Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté

L’honorable Mélanie Joly

Ministre des Affaires étrangères

 

Appel urgent à l’action en réponse à la crise afghane 

 

La population canadienne a accueilli avec unanimité l’annonce que le Canada allait admettre et réinstaller les Afghans qui ont aidé la mission canadienne ainsi que les Afghans vulnérables. Cette réponse positive reflète ce que les Canadiennes, les Canadiens ont de meilleur; c’est aussi la bonne chose à faire. Nous continuerons à défendre celles et ceux qui sont désormais sans protection dans l’Afghanistan des talibans, les femmes juges, les journalistes, les femmes en position d’autorité, les personnes LGBTI, les minorités religieuses et les défenseurs des droits de la personne. En tant que Canadiennes et Canadiens, c’est notre nature, ce que nous sommes, ce que nous devons nous efforcer d’être.

On ne peut nier la complexité des difficultés auxquelles le Canada fait face depuis la chute de Kaboul. On ne peut non plus échapper à la tragédie humaine qui s’est déroulée autour de l’aéroport et qui se poursuit encore aujourd’hui.

Nous vous écrivons en tant qu’individus et organisations profondément impliqués dans la réponse du Canada à la crise afghane, notamment au nom de celles et ceux qui participent aux efforts d’évacuation des personnes vulnérables hors de l’Afghanistan pour les faire venir au Canada. Il s’agit des personnes les plus exposées à la violence et aux représailles à la suite de la prise du pouvoir par les talibans à la mi-août 2021.

Toutefois, malgré les efforts collectifs des signataires, et malgré l’identification de ces personnes vulnérables dans le cadre du Programme spécial d’immigration et du Programme humanitaire spécial du Canada, peu d’Afghans identifiés « à risque » ont été évacués au Canada. Un très grand nombre d’entre eux demeurent en grave danger.

Très souvent, les talibans recherchent activement ces personnes : leur temps est     

compté. Leur évacuation en toute sécurité et leur réinstallation au Canada se sont avérées difficiles pour plusieurs raisons, dont certaines, cependant, dépendent du Canada.

Premièrement, la définition des personnes admissibles au Programme spécial d’immigration du Canada et à une réinstallation au Canada comme réfugiées manque de clarté. Deuxièmement, la capacité de traitement est insuffisante pour répondre à l’ampleur et à l’urgence de la situation actuelle. Enfin, en travaillant avec ses alliés, le Canada peut exercer le pouvoir dont il dispose collectivement pour faire pression sur les talibans dans le but que ceux-ci autorisent les personnes à risque à quitter l’Afghanistan en toute sécurité.

Pour commencer, les signataires souhaitent préciser qu’ils tiennent en très haute estime les fonctionnaires canadiens avec lesquels ils ont travaillé. Sans exception et en tout temps, ces fonctionnaires, ainsi que les membres du personnel politique impliqués ont fait preuve d’un engagement sans faille pour obtenir une réponse humaine et rapide. Ils ont mis la main à la pâte et n’ont ménagé aucun effort. Mais le pouvoir des fonctionnaires a ses limites. Il arrive un moment où un leadership politique s’impose, et où seule une direction ministérielle détient l’autorité nécessaire pour faire avancer les choses. 

Maintenant que le nouveau Cabinet est nommé, le moment est venu d’exercer ce leadership. Les signataires demandent ainsi au premier ministre Trudeau, à Sean Fraser, ministre de l’Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté du Canada, et à Mélanie Joly, ministre des Affaires étrangères, de s’attaquer de toute urgence aux quatre grands problèmes suivants, qui doivent être résolus si le Canada veut atteindre son objectif, à savoir assurer l’évacuation sûre et rapide hors de l’Afghanistan des personnes vulnérables ciblées dans le cadre des programmes spéciaux du Canada.

 

  • Clarifier la politique du Canada et en définir les termes

« Aide au Canada ». En juillet 2021, le Canada a annoncé la mise en place d’un programme destiné aux Afghans qui ont aidé le Canada et s’est engagé à protéger les personnes ayant fait la preuve d’une « relation importante et/ou durable avec le gouvernement du Canada ». Le Canada a établi des procédures simples pour présenter une demande, grâce auxquelles le passage de ces personnes en toute sécurité hors de l’Afghanistan serait facilité.

Le Canada a annoncé qu’il interpréterait le concept d’« aide au Canada » de manière large. Pourtant, il reste difficile de savoir qui est admissible.

Le Canada doit clarifier sa politique entre Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada (IRCC) et Affaires mondiales Canada. Il doit également continuer à interpréter les termes de manière large pour respecter l’esprit du programme annoncé en juillet 2021.

Catégories acceptées. En août 2021, le Canada a lancé un deuxième programme destiné aux Afghans vulnérables, entre autres les femmes en position d’autorité, les défenseurs des droits de la personne, les minorités religieuses ou ethniques persécutées, les personnes LGBTI et les journalistes qui ont aidé des journalistes canadiens.

En l’absence d’une antenne de l’Agence des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés en Afghanistan, le Canada a eu la sagesse de désigner d’autres organisations présentes sur place – Frontline Defenders et Protect Defenders – pour aider les personnes évacuées. Les signataires savent que l’intention de ces partenaires de recommandation consiste à créer un système équitable et transparent pour le traitement sur le terrain, en Afghanistan. Cependant, ces organisations ont leur propre mandat; elles concentrent essentiellement leurs activités sur les « défenseurs des droits de la personne », ce qui réduit considérablement le mandat autrement plus large des programmes du Canada.

Une fois de plus, le manque de clarté s’est avéré frustrant et a entravé les progrès de nombres d’intervenants qui tentent de s’orienter dans le système. Le Canada doit définir clairement qui sont les personnes pouvant faire une demande par l’entremise de ses programmes spéciaux ou de ses partenaires de recommandation.

De plus, le Canada doit chercher à établir des partenariats avec d’autres organisations sur le terrain, en Afghanistan, pour s’assurer que les personnes qui répondent par ailleurs aux critères d’admissibilité des programmes spéciaux puissent être identifiées, et leur dossier, traité.

  • Attribuer les considérables ressources nécessaires à l’accomplissement de la tâche et octroyer un pouvoir discrétionnaire aux décideurs, le cas échéant

Le travail en Afghanistan est urgent et exige beaucoup de temps. Recevoir les dossiers, les étudier, prendre des décisions, communiquer avec les demandeurs, les parties concernées et leurs représentants ne sont pas des activités qui se traitent comme des « affaires courantes ». Il faut augmenter considérablement et sur-le-champ les ressources humaines nécessaires pour permettre aux fonctionnaires canadiens de traiter les dossiers et de recevoir le grand nombre de personnes qui ne peuvent attendre que leurs documents soient analysés « selon le cours normal des choses ». Certes, les signataires sont tout à fait conscients que certaines ressources additionnelles ont déjà été allouées à ce portefeuille; pourtant, la situation en Afghanistan exige davantage, de toute urgence, notamment du personnel de traitement complémentaire. De plus, le Canada doit permettre à ses agents de prendre au besoin des décisions discrétionnaires pour accélérer le traitement des dossiers.

  • Renoncer à l’exigence de reconnaissance de l’Agence des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés et reconnaître la crise afghane comme une situation de réfugiés prima facie

Nous demandons au gouvernement de renoncer à l’exigence de reconnaissance de l’Agence des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés quant aux ressortissants afghans qui se réinstallent par l’entremise d’un parrainage privé. Nous demandons également aux ministres de reconnaître la crise afghane comme une situation de réfugiés prima facie.

  • En collaboration avec les alliés, exiger des garanties auprès des talibans

Le Canada et ses alliés doivent exercer toutes les pressions possibles pour obtenir des garanties de la part des talibans. Nous demandons au Canada d’exercer son influence internationale de concert avec des pays aux vues similaires pour faire pression sur les talibans afin que ceux-ci autorisent les personnes à risque à quitter l’Afghanistan en toute sécurité. Le Canada doit continuer à chercher à obtenir l’assurance que toutes les personnes qui se qualifient dans le cadre de ses programmes seront autorisées à quitter l’Afghanistan en toute sécurité. Plutôt que d’agir seul, le Canada doit s’adjoindre des alliés et les instances qui partagent ses vues pour obtenir ces garanties. C’est là un outil essentiel dont dispose le Canada pour aider les personnes désespérées qui lui tendent quotidiennement la main et qui relèvent du mandat que le Canada a accepté dans le cadre de ses programmes humanitaires et d’immigration spéciaux.

 

Conclusion

Monsieur le Premier Ministre, Madame et Messieurs les Ministres, cette situation urgente exige une réponse immédiate, multiforme et ciblée. Les Afghans en danger, comme les femmes juges, se cachent et sont activement poursuivis par des prisonniers libérés, des responsables talibans et ISIS-Khorosan. L’Afghanistan sombre dans une crise de plus en plus profonde où des individus sont laissés à la merci des talibans, souvent sans avoir la capacité de satisfaire leurs besoins de subsistance de base.

De plus, les signataires demandent au Canada de clarifier et de respecter son engagement d’adopter une interprétation élargie de la définition des personnes qui ont « aidé » le Canada et ses alliés en Afghanistan, et de soutenir – de manière concrète, pratique et immédiate – celles et ceux qui nous ont aidés. Nous demandons aussi au Canada de clarifier et de tenir sa promesse d’adopter une interprétation élargie de la définition des catégories acceptées dans le cadre du Programme humanitaire spécial, entre autres les femmes en position d’autorité, les défenseurs des droits de la personne, les minorités religieuses ou ethniques persécutées, les personnes LGBTI et les journalistes qui ont aidé des journalistes canadiens.

Quelques jours seulement après le début du mandat du nouveau Cabinet, ses membres sont appelés à faire face à cette crise. Et les moments de crise offrent parfois des occasions extraordinaires. Ils nous invitent à révéler notre véritable nature. L’évacuation efficace et sûre des personnes vulnérables hors de l’Afghanistan contribuera à illustrer les valeurs et les priorités du gouvernement nouvellement élu. Elle démontrera également la compassion et l’humanité de la population canadienne, tout en faisant appel à une responsabilité collective.

Alors que le nouveau Cabinet entame son indispensable travail, nous attendons avec impatience une réponse satisfaisante à cette lettre. Nous nous engageons à faire tout ce qui est en notre pouvoir pour aider le gouvernement à atteindre ces objectifs vitaux.

 

Sincerely,

Lloyd Axworthy, Fen Osler Hampson, The Honourable Ratna Omidvar, Allan Rock, World Refugee & Migration Council 

Asma Fairzi, Adeena Niazi, Afghan Women’s Organization Refugee and Immigrant Services

Ketty Nivyabandi, Amnesty International Canada

Stephanie Valois, Association québécoise des avocats et avocates en droit de l’immigration

Aviva Bassman, Canadian Association for Refugee Lawyers

Ibrahim Mohebi, Canadian Hazara Humanitarian Services

Farida Deif, Human Rights Watch 

Sally Armstrong, Wendy Cukier, Hila Taraky, Lifeline Afghanistan

Rachel Pulfer, Journalist for Human Rights

Warda Shazadi Meighen, Erin Simpson, Jacqueline Swaisland, Landings LLP

Grace Westcott, Peter Showler, PEN Canada

Kimahli Powell, L.L.D (Hons) Rainbow Railroad